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June 2010

 

Wednesday 30th June

Had a look for the Montagu's Harriers at lunchtime and quickly picked up the female patrolling the fields. As I went to leave the male appeared overhead carrying a small rodent. Also 3 Buzzards and a couple of Marsh Harriers.

This evening produced a moth I'd not seen before, and a very distinctive-looking one at that, a Peach Blossom. New for the year were Yellow Shell and 3 Swallow-tailed Moths.

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Peach Blossom (left) and Yellow Shell (right), Bawdeswell, 30th June

 

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Mottled Rustic (left) and Coleophora mayrella (right), Bawdeswell, 30th June

 

Montagu's Harrier (left) and Buzzard (right), north Norfolk, 30th June

 

Tuesday 29th June

Not quite so many moths again tonight - Chequered Straw was new for the year.

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Chequered Straw (left) and Coleophora sp. (right), Bawdeswell, 30th June

 

Monday 28th June

Compared to some recent nights there wasn't that much excitement on the moth front, though still quite a good selection - about 30 moths of 17 species.

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Small Blood-vein (left) and Flame Shoulder (right), Bawdeswell, 28th June

 

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Garden Grass-veneer (left) and Plum Tortrix (right), Bawdeswell, 28th June

 

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Small Fan-foot (left) and Dark Arches (right), Bawdeswell, 28th June

 

Sunday 27th June

Another good selection of moths, the best of the macros being my first Dotted Fan-foot, a nationally scarce species, though apparently increasing in Norfolk at least. Some new species from among the micros too, though I don't think experienced moth trappers would find any of them particularly remarkable: Brown-dotted Clothes Moth, Clepsis consimilana and Dipleurina lacustrata. Others new for the year included Small Blood-vein, Oegoconia sp., Caloptilia syringella and Large Tabby. (updated in July following reidentification of the Clothes Moth and again in July 2011 with the Dipleurina, which I'm still not sure about but it's more likely that Eudonia lineola which I did have it down as!)

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Dotted Fan-foot (left) and Snout (right), Bawdeswell, 27th June

 

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Bright-line Brown-eye, Bawdeswell, 27th June

 

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Clepsis consimilana (left) and Hook-marked Straw Moth (right), Bawdeswell, 27th June

 

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Large Tabby (left) and Bee Moth (right), Bawdeswell, 27th June

 

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Dipleurina lacustrata (left) and Scoparia ambigualis (right), Bawdeswell, 27th June

 

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Phlyctaenia coronata (left) and Caloptilia syringella (right), Bawdeswell, 27th June

 

Saturday 26th June (updated in July)

Another Flame tonight - or is it the same one that hid for two days and a night? My niggling doubt over my original ID of these proved to be well-placed and eventually, when a third turned up in July I resolved the ID. Quite a few other moths tonight but nothing remarkable - Bright-lined Brown-eye and Angle Shades were my first this year.

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Flame (left) and Bright-line Brown-eye (right), Bawdeswell, 26th June

 

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Brown Rustic (left) and Dark Arches (right), Bawdeswell, 26th June

 

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Small Fan-foot (left) and Scoparia ambigualis (right), Bawdeswell, 26th June

 

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Common Pug (left) and Freyer's Pug (right), Bawdeswell, 26th June

 

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Brown House-moths, Bawdeswell, 26th June - the one on the left was bigger than usual at 15mm while the one on the right was a more typical (in my experience) 10mm - are these size differences gender-related or just normal variation (or have I misidentified one of them)?

 

Friday 25th June

New moths, especially distinctive macros, are always exciting, even when I'm relatively new to mothing and there are a lot of common species I've not yet seen. But every now and then I stumble upon something really amazing that takes my breath away in a way that rarely happens with any other group of lifeforms. This happened tonight when after I'd finished photographing the various moths on the walls and ceiling and was about to go to bed, I noticed what looked like a broken birch twig on the bit of carpet I'd just walked over. That struck me as being slightly unusual as there aren't many birch trees in my bedroom, so I took a closer look. Fortunately I'd not trodden on it, as it turned out to be a Buff-tip, a common species of moth but one I'd not seen before, and a totally unique creature.

Other species included Common Emerald, Freyer's Pug, Common Footman and Small Fan-foot.

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Buff-tip, Bawdeswell, 25th June

 

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Common Emerald (left) and Mottled Beauty (right), Bawdeswell, 25th June

 

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Small Fan-foot (left) and Light Arches (right), Bawdeswell, 25th June

 

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Common Marbled Carpet?, Bawdeswell, 25th June - not quite sure about this one...

 

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Paraswammerdamia nebulella, Bawdeswell, 25th June - could the other Swammerdamia-like things earlier this month be this species, despite the more extensive white at the front?

 

Thursday 24th June (updated in July)

A new macro today - Flame - and a couple of particularly attractive ones that I have seen before but not very often: Barred Yellow and Clouded Silver. A Coleophora sp. was one I've not seen before, being one of the striated species, but probably isn't identifiable without a more intimate examination than I'm inclined to give it! If my tentative Double Square-spot wasn't in fact a Triple-spotted Clay then that was new for the year too, but I struggle with these two when they don't show me their underwings.

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Grey Partridges, Amner, 24th June

 

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Barred Yellow (left) and Clouded Silver (right), Bawdeswell, 24th June

 

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Double Square-spot (left) and Flame (right), Bawdeswell, 24th June - I think the left hand on is Double Square-spot as opposed to Triple-spotted Clay, but if any more experienced moth-ers can confirm or contradict please get in touch!

 

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Epiblema trimaculana (left) and Coleophora sp. (right), Bawdeswell, 24th June

 

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Scorched Carpet, Bawdeswell, 24th June

 

Wedesday 23rd June

New moths for the year are still coming thick and fast with Bee Moth, Straw Dots, Treble Brown Spot, Coleophora mayrella, Crambus perlella (I think) and Cork Moths tonight. Apparently Celypha lacunana is a very common species, but tonight's was the first I've identified nonetheless (update: but I later identified one from yesterday's photos too).

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White Ermine (left) and Treble Brown Spot (right), Bawdeswell, 23rd June

 

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Epiblema trimaculana (left) and Celypha lacunana (right), Bawdeswell, 23rd June

 

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Cork Moths, Bawdeswell, 23rd June

 

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Coleophora mayrella (left) and Crambus perlella? (right), Bawdeswell, 23rd June - not sure the darkish subterminal band fits perlella but can't see what else it could be...?

 

Tuesday 22nd June

A good night for moths - 2 Sandy Carpets, one more than 50% larger than the other, were my first since 2008. Either an Uncertain or a Rustic, and a Mottled Rustic, were both new for the year, as was Fan-foot, and a host of micros provided me with no shortage of ID problems although I think I've sorted out most of them - if you can help with the others please get in touch!

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Light Brown Apple Moth (left) and Buff Ermine (right), Bawdeswell, 22nd June

 

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Sandy Carpets, Bawdeswell, 22nd June

 

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Epiblema trimaculana (left) and Celypha lacunana (right), Bawdeswell, 22nd June

 

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Eucosma cana (left) and Swammerdamia comnplex sp. (right), Bawdeswell, 22nd June - I think the Swammerdamia (or related) is probably the same species as below on 5th June; the extent of white made me think then of Paraswammerdamia albicapitella but I think that flies a bit later so I'm really not sure.

 

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Brown House-moth (left) and Coleophora sp. (right), Bawdeswell, 22nd June

 

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Uncertain or Rustic (left) and Mottled Rustic (right), Bawdeswell, 22nd June

 

Monday 21st June

Some more common moths that were new for the year tonight: Triple-spotted Clay, Phlyctaenia coronata, Common Wave and Riband Wave.

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dark Pheasant chick, Houghton, 21st June

 

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Triple-spotted Clay (left) and Common Wave (right), Bawdeswell, 20th June

 

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Phlyctaenia coronata (left) and Orange Ladybird (right), Bawdeswell, 20th June

 

Sunday 20th June

A few moths in tonight including some new for the year: Dwarf Cream Wave, Willow Beauty and Garden Grass-veneer.

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Garden Grass-veneer (left) and Dwarf Cream Wave(right), Bawdeswell, 20th June

 

I've finally finished my Turkey trip report - click on the White-throated Robin to take a look!

White-throated Robin

 

Saturday 19th June

The northerly blow tempted me to go seawatching but with limited time available I opted instead to pay Cley a quick visit. There 2 lurid Chilean Flamingoes shared a pool with 7 Spoonbills, and an eighth Spoonbill later flew in to the reserve. A family of Mute Swans swam past the hide and two of the six cygnets were of the white "Polish" morph. The Flamingoes clearly weren't wild, but may well have come from a feral population that's reported to exist in Holland/Germany. Not sure if that population is regarded as self-sustaining but if so these birds could arguably be counted as "category C vagrants". Either way it's about time we had some clarity as to whether or not BOU will deem category C vagrants as worthy of a place on the British list.

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Chilean Flamingoes, Cley, 19th June

 

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Spoonbills, Cley, 19th June

 

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Swift (left) and Mute Swans including 2 'Polish' cygnets (right), Cley, 19th June

 

Thursday 17th June

A better night for moths again, with the likes of Burnished Brass, more Brown Rustics and a Snout. Easy as though it's supposed to be, I still feel no inclination to examine the genitalia of moths in order to establish a certain identification, so I'm happy enough that the Minor shown below is probably a Tawny Marbled Minor. Maybe one day I'll get hold of some appropriate tools for a more up front and personal examination, just to make sure. I probably ought to be able to identify the Pug without resorting to such measures, but I'm not sure, so please shout if you are.

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Burnished Brass (left) and probable Tawny Marbled Minor (right), Bawdeswell, 17th June

 

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Pug sp., Bawdeswell, 17th June - please let me know what you think is!

 

Wednesday 16th June

On the way home from Norwich at dusk tonight I took some back routes in the hope of coming across a live Badger; no such luck but I did clock up 2 Barn Owls, 1 Tawny Owl and 2 Little Owls.

 

Tuesday 15th June

Not much tonight, 2 Common Wainscots being all apart from these two:

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Spectacle (left) and Mottled Beauty (right), Bawdeswell, 15th June

 

Monday 14th June

Just 3 moths in tonight, though 2 were new for the year: Dark Arches and Mottled Beauty. The other was Silver-ground Carpet.

 

Sunday 13th June

Few moths tonight, though Plum Tortrix was my first this year.

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Plum Tortrix, Bawdeswell, 13th June

 

Saturday 12th June

Among tonight's moths were migrant species Silver-Y and Diamond-backed Moth; also my first Cream Wave of the year.

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White Ermine (left) and Cream Wave (right), Bawdeswell, 12th June

 

Friday 11th June

Another new species today but this one was a bit more exciting as it's a nationally scarce species and one that, according to the Norfolk Moths website, is only recorded about 6-7 times in Norfolk each year and hasn't been recorded this far up the Wensum Valley at all: it was a Buttoned Snout. It was a better night for moths generally with, among others, my first 2 Brown Rustics of the year and, always a favourite although not uncommon, 2 Buff Ermines.

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Buttoned Snout, Bawdeswell, 11th June

 

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Brown Rustics, Bawdeswell, 11th June

 

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Buff Ermine (left) and Common Wainscot (right), Bawdeswell, 11th June

 

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Common Pugs, Bawdeswell, 11th June - usual caveats apply as my confidence in Pug ID remains pretty low!

 

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Grey Partridges, Sandringham, 11th June

 

Thursday 10th June

I think this is a Heart and Club in which case although it's supposed to a common species it's the first time I've seen one. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong!

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Heart and Club, Bawdeswell, 10th June

 

Wednesday 9th June

Saw 2 Fox cubs in different driveway entrances in Jessopp Road in Norwich this evening.

It's now my fourth summer of leaving my window open and letting the moths in but I'm still getting new species on a regular basis. Tonight's was a Shoulder-striped Wainscot. Not much else apart from Heart and Dart and a couple of Common Swifts.

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Shoulder-striped Wainscot (left) and Heart and Dart (right), Bawdeswell, 9th June

 

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Orange-tip (left) and Common Poppies (above & right), Ringstead, 9th June

 

Tuesday 8th June

Another lunch time Little Gull today, this time flying around by the reservoir at Thornham.

 

Monday 7th June

A quick look over Titchwell from the Choseley Road at Thornham produced a Little Gull but I spent the rest of the lunch time at Thornham where a Mediterranean Gull could be heard calling. Not so many moths tonight, though the few included another fine Chinese Character; the Ghost Moth must have arrived unseen last night as it was there before I opened the window.

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Grey Partridge, Thornham, 7th June

 

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Ghost Moth (left) and Common Pug (right), Bawdeswell, 7th June

 

Sunday 6th June

A few moths in tonight, the highlights being a Middle-barred Minor and my first ever Pale Tussock.

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Pale Tussock (left) and Middle-barred Minor (right), Bawdeswell, 6th June

 

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Silver-ground Carpet (left) and White Ermine (right), Bawdeswell, 6th June

 

Saturday 5th June

A busy weekend doing non-birdy things meant I didn't get to see the 5 Black-winged Stilts that turned up at Titchwell, or the Gull-billed Tern that flew through, or anything else of avian interest. It was an excellent evening though with over 50 moths of 22 species visiting the bedroom! Among the macros, highlights were my first ever Pale-shouldered Brocade, 4 White Ermines and a Common Marbled Carpet of a very dark form that I've not seen before. I'm still not sure I'm not overlooking things among the Pugs, of which there were over 20. Apart from a few Mottled Pugs most seemed to be Common Pugs, but surely there must be the odd Grey Pug slipping through, and I suspect there are others I'm missing too. The micros included up to 5 new species for me, although I'm only reasonably confident about the ID of 3 of these, Triaxomera parasitella, Epiblema cynosbatella and Crambus lathoniellus. I think Paraswammerdamia albicapitella might be right too, though I'm not certain, but Coleophora discordella is pretty much guesswork. As always, confirmation (or correction) of any of my identifications is welcome - please get in touch!

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White Ermine (left) and Common Swift (right), Bawdeswell, 5th June

 

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Pale-shouldered Brocade (left) and Rustic Shoulder-knot (right), Bawdeswell, 5th June

 

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Common Marbled Carpet (left) and Silver-ground Carpet (right), Bawdeswell, 5th June

 

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Triaxomera parasitella (left) and Blastobasis lacticolella (right), Bawdeswell, 5th June

 

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Coleophora sp., perhaps C. discordella? (left) and Paraswammerdamia albicapitella (right), Bawdeswell, 5th June - not 100% sure about either of these (update - and the Swammerdamia thing probably isn't right as Parasw. albicapitella isn't supposed to fly this early)

 

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Epiblema cynosbatella (left) and Hook-marked Straw Moth (right), Bawdeswell, 5th June

 

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Small Dusty Wave (left) and Crambus lathoniellus (right), Bawdeswell, 5th June

 

Friday 4th June

Quite a few moths this evening, including my first Shuttle-shaped Dart. Also Mottled Pug, Common Wainscot, Dark-barred Twin-spot Carpet, Garden Carpet, Garden Pebble, 3 Brimstones and a few Common Pugs.

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Pheasant chick, Houghton, 4th June

 

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Mottled Pug (left) and Shuttle-shaped Dart (right), Bawdeswell, 4th June

 

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Garden Carpet (left) and Common Wainscot (right), Bawdeswell, 4th June

 

Thursday 3rd June

Tonight's moths included a nice Buff Ermine and a few more Common Pugs. Still sorting out the Turkey photos, in case you're wondering, but here are a few to keep up the interest...

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Long-legged Buzzards, Little Crake, Black Francolin, Spur-winged Plover, Striated Scops Owl, Bimaculated Lark and White-throated Kingfisher, Turkey, May

 

Wednesday 2nd June

Popped in to Cley on the way home where the Trumpeter Finch had been lost. Fearing a long wait I almost instantly saw a small pink think flying past and landing on the shingle ridge. A short while later and a small crowd of us were watching the Trumpeter Finch but contrary to the experience of several folk who've come away with amazing photos, this bird didn't approach me for its photo but kept itself at a respectable distance. On the moth front, nothing but Pugs (all Common Pugs I think) tonight.

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Trumpeter Finch, Cley, 2nd June

 

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Snow Goose (left) and Lapwing (right), Cley, 2nd June

 

Tuesday 1st June

Saw both Ruddy Duck and Red-crested Pochard during my lunch break. Having now seen photos of the Trumpeter Finch I started to regret not going to see it last night but today several new birds were found in the same area and a visit after work was in order. Priority was the Thrush Nightingale at Walsey Hills as this would be my first in Norfolk. Sadly it remained firmly hidden for the duration of the evening and only gave a few very short bursts of song, too short to be able to confirm whether it was indeed a Thrush Nightingale or just a Common Nightingale, as some have suggested may be the case. With this taking up all my time I didn't get to see the Trumpeter Finch or Marsh Warbler.

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Willow Warbler, Walsey Hills, 1st June

 

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