October 2012

 

Monday 29th October

An Epirrita sp. was the only moth this week.

 

Saturday 27th October

We stayed over at The Neptune last night so I didn't start birding until after breakfast. I figured I'd have already missed the best of any seawatching and as NW Norfolk doesn't provide much opportunity for seawatching in shelter I decided to cut my losses and search for rare thrushes instead. We headed slowly eastwards along the coast, focusing mainly on the hedgerows a little bit inland of the coast road as I figured these would have been less well watched. Numbers were clearly down compared to what's been around during the week but it still wasn't hard to find big flocks of thrushes. This was enjoyable enough, but it wasn't until mid afternoon that I found anything remotely interesting, as I came across a nice Ring Ouzel (and at least 2 Bramblings) at the pit near Bilsey Hill (no, I'd never heard of that either - it's just south of Blakeney).

I was here when Dave texted me (thanks!) to say that some people thought the Arctic Redpoll at Holkham was a Hornemann's. Arctic Redpolls are regular enough in Norfolk but those belonging to the hornemanni race (or species?) from Greenland or Arctic Canada are extremely rare in Norfolk. Even so I didn't rush back to Holkham, but paused to photograph a showy Barn Owl at Wiveton Downs. By the time I reached Holkham the pager had announced the revised ID and I made haste to the spot in the dunes where it had been showing really well all day. Fortunately it was still showing well, and far from the photographers getting too close and scaring it (as was alleged by one person who later missed it), this Hornemann's Arctic Redpoll was getting too close to the photographers for them to focus on it! Well, OK, I didn't quite have that problem, but it was certainly a very obliging bird and a very smart one too. A very nice birthday present for me! A late Swallow was flying around the freshmarsh as we returned to the car.

click for larger image click for larger image

Bar-tailed Godwit, Brancaster Staithe (left) and Redwing, Thornham (right), 27th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image

Wigeon, Burnham Overy Staithe, 27th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Ringed Plover, Wells (left) and Fieldfare, south of Wells (right), 27th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image

Fieldfares, Wighton, 27th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Ring Ouzel, near Bilsey Hill (south of Blakeney), 27th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image

Barn Owl, Wiveton Downs, 27th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image

Hornemann's Arctic Redpoll, Holkham Dunes, 27th October - sorry for the photo overload but getting it down to 20 was quite an achievement having taken something like 1500!

 

click for larger image  

rainbow, East Hills, 27th October - did anyone get out to East Hills today to look for the treasure at the end of the rainbow?

 

Friday 26th October

Tonight we went to The Neptune in Old Hunstanton for a nice meal. Before leaving I put the light on for just a few minutes, attracting a Green-brindled Crescent.

 

Thursday 25th October

Another lunch time visit to Thornham was dominated by hundreds and hundreds of thrushes. Best among these was another Ring Ouzel along the road to the reservoir. No moths tonight.

 

Wednesday 24th October

I decided I didn't quite have enough time in my lunch break to see the Arctic Warbler at Brancaster Staithe, given it was a bit of a walk from the car park and had been elusive, so instead returned to Titchwell and Thornham to find my own rarity. The fog hasn't cleared since Monday and there are still hundreds of Redwings, Fieldfares and Blackbirds everywhere along the coast and the hedgerows running inland. The best I found among them was Ring Ouzel and Brambling along Choseley Road at Titchwell.

Just 3 moths tonight: Clothes Moth sp. probably Tinea sp., Merveille du Jour and Yellow-line Quaker.

click for larger image click for larger image

Ring Ouzel, Titchwell, 24th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Merveille du Jour, Bawdeswell, 24th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Yellow-line Quaker (left) and Clothes Moth sp. (right), Bawdeswell, 24th October - my guess is that the Clothes Moth is Case-bearing Clothes Moth Tinea pellionella

 

Tuesday 23rd October

A lot of yesterday's birds were still around today but it sounds like there were few new arrivals. The fog was even worse so it took me longer than usual to get to the coast in my lunch break, leaving me with just a few minutes to look for birds. Even so the number of birds was extraordinary. I could only see a few feet in front of me but I must have seen several hundred Redwings and not many fewer Fieldfares and Blackbirds, as well as a handful of other migrants (not including a Ring Ouzel I could hear calling). I so wish I could have got out yesterday, or even today for more than a few minutes.

Today wasn't without excitement though. Among a pretty tiny catch of moths tonight was one I didn't recognise. It took me a while to work out what it was but eventually I got there: Dark Aspen Bell Epinotia maculana. This nationally scarce species has only been recorded 5 times in Norfolk before - only 3 since the 1800s. Otherwise an Ashy Button Acleris sparsana (my third this autumn but I'd only had two previously), 2 Epirrita sp. and a Barred Sallow were the lot.

click for larger image click for larger image

Dark Aspen Bell Epinotia maculana, Bawdeswell, 23rd October

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Redwings, Thornham, 23rd October

 

Monday 22nd October

I thought today would be good and it was. I don't think I've ever read so many exuberant accounts written by people buzzing with excitement after an amazing day's birding and a phenonemal fall of migrants. Days like this don't come along very often, they don't happen every year, or even every few years. This was a day to be out birding if at all possible. This was a day when I was stuck in the office working. As I moved between meetings I could hear Redwings in the fog overhead but that was the nearest I could get to all the excitement that those lucky enough to be able to go birding during the week were lapping up. I need to retire!

I'm getting home well after dark nowadays so I'm missing what's often the best bit of the evening for moths. Tonight I managed 2 Epirrita sp., Large Yellow Underwing, Brick and Silver Y (a migrant?).

click for larger image  

Brick, Bawdeswell, 22nd October

 

Sunday 21st October

NE winds in autumn should bring migrant birds and cloud and rain should ground them, so you'd have thought that today would have been a good day for birding! Well of course it takes more than just NE winds and rain, the birds have to be migrating in the first place, and this morning there was a thick band of rain covering the west of the Scandinavia and the low countries. Nothing was going to set off from there in those conditions and so I had a nasty feeling that the NE wind here wouldn't be carrying much and the rain and cloud wouldn't ground much. And so it proved. I arrived at Sheringham early afternoon and spent the rest of the day hammering the patch with Kevin. We thoroughly checked numerous fields and hedgerows and apart from a fairly unremarkable number of Meadow Pipits and Skylarks, 4 Stonechats (at least some of which are local individuals), 2-3 Robins and a Song Thrush, we found nothing. Completely and utterly dead! I knew tomorrow would be another story, but sadly I'd have to be at work then.

The moths tonight weren't much more remarkable: Blair's Shoulder-knot, Setaceous Hebrew Character and Epirrita sp.

 

Saturday 20th October

I started off at Sheringham this morning hoping for some vis mig. I got what I hoped for! Redwings were heading inland as I parked my car and as I wandered slowly towards the clifftop flocks of Starlings swept west low over the fields as small parties of finches passed west over my head. Birds were moving on a broad front - some were coming in off the sea, many were high over the fields and I could see flocks moving over the ridge well inland as well. I was on my own so had no hope of getting an accurate count - suffice to say that the number I recorded must have been much, much lower than the number of birds that actually went through this morning. I notched up about 350 Chaffinches and 1200 Starlings with smaller numbers of Lapwing, Snipe, Curlew, Stock Dove, Woodpigeon, Skylark, Meadow Pipit, Pied/White Wagtail, Jay, Brambling, Greenfinch, Goldfinch, Siskin, Linnet and Reed Bunting. Allowing for all the birds I either didn't see or didn't identify because they were too far off, there must have been several thousand finches moving through in the first hour or two of this morning. Over the cliffs there were no big flocks to push the numbers up, just a constant trickle, but a mile or two inland I saw quite a few much bigger flinch flocks that were too distant to name. A brace of Little Egrets headed west over the sea but I didn't manage to pick out anything scarcer from all these birds.

I had a hunt round part of the patch for grounded migrants but this was to no avail - nothing seemed to have dropped in at all. So onwards to Blickling where the Norfolk Moth Survey was holding a leaf-mining day. Having never studied leaf mines at all this was quite a new experience, and it was good to have the country's leading leaf mine experts on hand to explain what was what. I'm not sure how many species they found in the end but the ones I noted down included 19 species that I'd not previously recorded. Birds weren't the focus of attention but I couldn't help but notice the likes of Brambling, Nuthatch and Treecreeper calling.

Rob and I decided this would be a good place to bring our lights so we returned later for some more traditional mothing! At first it seemed pretty dire with just 2 moths at each light so we were about to call it a day early, but then things started picking up a little. It wasn't exactly heaving: we got December Moth, Red-green Carpet, Common Marbled Carpet, 2 Grey Pine Carpets, Spruce Carpet, 4+ Epirrita sp., Green-brindled Crescent, 2 Merveille du Jour, Yellow-line Quaker and Barred Sallow.

Back at home I put the light on briefly and attracted just one moth, a rather late Lesser Yellow Underwing.

click for larger image click for larger image

an empty wood desperately waiting for a Red-flanked Bluetail (left) and Yellowhammer (right), Sheringham, 20th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image

White-spot Pigmy Ectoedemia heringi (left) and Pinch-barred Pigmy Ectoedemia atricollis (right), Blickling, 20th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Lime Bent-wing Bucculatrix thoracella (left) and Bordered Carl Emmetia marginea (right), Blickling, 20th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Oak Carl Tischeria ekebladella (left) and Nut Leaf Blister Moth Phyllonorycter coryli (right), Blickling, 20th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Larch Case-bearer Coleophora laricella (left) and Brown Smoke Taleporia tubulosa (right), Blickling, 20th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Grizzly Bear (or something like that), Blickling, 20th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Yellow-line Quaker (left) and December Moth (right), Blickling, 20th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Merveille du Jours, Blickling, 20th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Spruce Carpet (left) and Grey Pine Carpet (right), Blickling, 20th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Amethyst Deceiver, Blickling (left) and Red-legged Partridge, near Itteringham (right), 20th October - thanks to Mick for confirming the mushroom ID! The partridge, and another a few yards on, were exhibiting interesting behaviour - sitting at the edge of the road in the rain and apparently unconcerned by my close approach

 

Friday 19th October

Just 5 moths tonight: Ashy Button Acleris sparsana, Grey Pine Carpet, Setaceous Hebrew Character, Brick (my first this year) and Barred Sallow.

click for larger image click for larger image

Ashy Button Acleris sparsana (left) and Brick (right), Bawdeswell, 19th October

 

Thursday 18th October

A few moths again tonight: Mallow, 6 Epirrita sp., Feathered Thorn (first this year), 2 Setaceous Hebrew Characters, Blair's Shoulder-knot, Chestnut and Pale Mottled Willow.

click for larger image click for larger image

Pale Mottled Willow (left) and Feathered Thorn (right), Bawdeswell, 17th October

 

Wednesday 17th October

Confirmed an excellent new bird for the garden this morning! For the second time this autumn I thought I heard a Firecrest calling while I was in the bathroom getting ready for work. This time it stuck around long enough for me to see it - only a glimpse but plenty to confirm it was indeed a Firecrest. Nice start to the day!

Conditions were the best they've been for moths in ages but at first nothing seemed to arrive. By the time I turned in though there had been a good selection including several interesting ones: 4 Light Brown Apple Moths Epiphyas postvittana, Common Plume Emmelina monodactyla, Red-green Carpet, Common Marbled Carpet, Epirrita sp., Black Rustic (my second here), Chestnut, Dark Chestnut (first this season), Red-line Quaker (new for the year), Beaded Chestnut and Pale Mottled Willow (new for the year and third ever).

click for larger image click for larger image

Pale Mottled Willow (left) and Red-line Quaker (right), Bawdeswell, 16th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Dark Chestnut (left) and Chestnut (right), Bawdeswell, 16th October - actually not completely convinced they're not both Dark Chestnuts?

 

click for larger image click for larger image
Black Rustic (left) and Red-green Carpet (right), Bawdeswell, 16th October

 

Tuesday 16th October

This evening's moths were November Moth agg., Blair's Shoulder-knot, Chestnut, Beaded Chestnut and Silver Y.

click for larger image click for larger image
Chestnut (left) and Silver Y (right), Bawdeswell, 15th October

 

Monday 15th October

A lunch-time drive produced a female Hen Harrier between Shernborne and Amner - or at least I was pretty confident that's what it was while I was watching it. Unfortunately the photos seem to show a four-fingered harrier, which is troubling me slightly - did I overlook something a bit better (or a lot better)? I fear that the photos may not be sufficient to confirm, but let me know if you think they point to a clear ID.

Among tonight's moths was my first November Moth of the autumn, at least that's what I think it is. Since last year I've learned that it's possible to do these on genitalia without needing to kill them first, but only the males - this one seemed to be female so, as I have no plans to dissect it, it shall have to go down simply as Epirrita sp. Other moths were 2 Blair's Shoulder-knots, Green-brindled Crescent, Beaded Chestnut and Barred Sallow.

click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image  

probable Hen Harrier, between Shernborne and Amner, 15th October - I thought I'd ID'd this okay in the field but on seeing the 4-fingered wing-tips on the photos I've started to wonder; I think there are features of both Montagu's and Pallid that are missing here, so I'm inclined to think my original ID was correct... am I right?

 

click for larger image click for larger image

probable November Moth (left) and Green-brindled Crescent (right), Bawdeswell, 15th October

 

Sunday 14th October

With a north-westerly breeze increSunday 14th Octoberasing as the day went on I hoped there would be a good late afternoon sea watch on the cards. There was a chance of grounded passerines too with rain in the middle of the day so I started off mid afternoon at the wood at Sheringham, hoping that the rain would have finished by that time. In fact the rain was pretty steady and so after a good look round the wood seeing nothing I moved on to the Leas to watch the sea. I got there just after Dave B had seen a Leach's Petrel but although there were lots of birds, there was nothing particularly scarce. I didn't count carefully but I'd estimate 200 Little Gulls, 100 Kittiwakes and 40 Great Skuas. A small handful of smaller skuas may have included 1-2 Poms but only a couple of Arctics showed well enough to secure the ID. Other seabirds included 2 Manx Shearwaters and Shag, while a Short-eared Owl was probably the bird of the day.

 

Saturday 13th October

Having stayed with Vitty's parents last night in Broadstairs I met up with my brother in King George VI Memorial Park for some birding. Conditions were better than forecast (cloudier, a bit of rain, so not what most people would regard as better I suppose) and it was immediately clear that birds were on the move. Both Siskins and Redpolls were flying over constantly, though it wasn't always clear whether they were new birds going through or the same birds flying around. Good numbers of Swallows, House Martins and a variety of other common migrants were passing overhead and there seemed to be a few birds grounded too. Mostly Goldcrests, Song Thrushes and Chiffchaffs but we also found Ring Ouzel and at least 3 Firecrests. I didn't see the Cockatiel that Andrew found but the place was heaving with Ring-necked Parakeets.

We went on to Margate Cemetery which seemed very much quieter. A Little Owl and a tame Red Fox were the highlights until we eventually found a flock that contained at least 1 Firecrest. After that I joined Vitty and her parents for a very nice lunch at the Ambrette - great food and quite unlike any Indian restaurant I've been to before.

click for larger image click for larger image

Jay, King George VI Memorial Park, Ramsgate (left) and Red Fox, Margate Cemetery (right), 13th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image  

Ring-necked Parakeets, King George VI Memorial Park, Ramsgate, 13th October

 

Thursday 11th October

My third ever Grey Shoulder-knot was a nice change from all the Blair's Shoulder-knots that have been turning up lately! Also Clothes Moth sp. Tinea (or Niditinea) sp., White-shouldered House-moth Endrosis sarcitrella, Common Plume Emmelina monodactyla, 2 Beaded Chestnuts and 2 Lunar Underwings.

click for larger image click for larger image

Crane-fly (left) and Grey Shoulder-knot (right), Bawdeswell, 11th October - let me know if you can identify the Crane-fly...

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Beaded Chestnuts, Bawdeswell, 11th October

 

Wednesday 10th October

Had a quick wander down the footpath that runs down the west edge of Holkham Park in my lunch break - not been down here before but I reckon it would be a good place to run a moth trap some time. A flock of 36 Redwing flew over - my first this autumn - and a vocal Crossbill remained hidden from view.

A few moths in tonight, with the first up being a completely new one for me: Garden Midget Phyllonorycter messaniella. Also Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana, Narrow-winged Grey Eudonia angustea, 2 Blair's Shoulder-knots, Chestnut and Beaded Chestnut. That's now 6 Blair's Shoulder-knots in a week - pretty remarkable given that I'd never had one prior to the last week!

click for larger image click for larger image

Chestnut (left) and Garden Midget Phyllonorycter messaniella (right), Bawdeswell, 10th October

 

click for larger image  

Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana, Bawdeswell, 10th October

 

Tuesday 9th October

Another Blair's Shoulder-knot was the only moth tonight - the third night running one has turned up - extraordinary for a moth that I'd never seen until last week!

 

Monday 8th October

Best moth tonight was my second ever Mallow. A third Blair's Shoulder-knot also turned up along with my first Chestnut of the autumn, Beaded Chestnut and a record count of 4 Barred Sallows.

click for larger image click for larger image

Barred Sallow (left) and Mallow (right), Bawdeswell, 8th October

 

click for larger image  

Blair's Shoulder-knot, Bawdeswell, 8th October

 

Sunday 7th October

Another Blair's Shoulder-knot tonight, along with Beaded Chestnut and Lunar Underwing.

click for larger image click for larger image

Beaded Chestnut (left) and Lunar Underwing (right), Bawdeswell, 7th October

 

Saturday 6th October

Spent most of today at Cley. Nice day, lots of birds, good company, but nothing very remarkable or unusual to report! Fortunately the group I was helping with enjoy watching common birds as much as rare ones, and there were plenty of common birds to look at! I wonder how many Jays we would have seen moving west had we started earlier and been watching from the ridge - from the reserve we saw just 3 move through but given the numbers reported moving south at Hunstanton this morning (668!) I imagine a reasonably good count would have been obtained from the ridge behind the reserve from where Mark counted 278 on Thursday. Around the reserve Bearded Tits were calling all over the place but mostly unseen in the breeze except for brief flight views. Equally brief was a Kingfisher that dashed past the hide just under our noses. A strolll down East Bank produced a couple of Spotted Redshanks (the group always seem to get more excited by seeing Curlews though). Plenty of Migrant Hawkers and Common Darters were in evidence but all of the many moth-like insects I saw turned out to be Caddisflies upon closer inspection (except for a caterpillar which I think might have been a Buff Ermine).

After Cley I tottered along to Salthouse. Might have seen the Ibis again from the car but didn't think it was worth causing an accident to confirm! I did have a quick scan from further up though seeing a drake Mandarin (presumably the same bird that was reported both at Walcott and flying west past Kelling) and John's geese (including a Ross's x Barnacle hybrid and a Greylag x Canada). On the way home I pulled in briefly to find a number of Common Nettle-taps Anthophila fabriciana were flying around - seems to be a really good year for this moth, unless I've just overlooked them before.

An interesting evening for moths at home - just 4 moths but every one of them being a species that I'd not seen at home before this year: Parsnip Moth Depressaria heraclei, Ashy Button Acleris sparsana (only my third ever), Red-green Carpet and Rosy Rustic (also only my third at home).

click for larger image click for larger image

Pintails, Cley, 6th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image

Wigeon, Cley, 6th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Mute Swans (left) and Teal (right), Cley, 6th October

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Starlings, Cley, 6th October - several small flocks migrating west throughout the day

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Migrant Hawker (left) and unidentified caterpillar (right), Cley, 6th October - I think the caterpillar is Buff Ermine but there are other species that can look quite similar (e.g. Ruby Tiger) so I'm not completely sure - let me know if you're more confident!

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Rosy Rustic (left) and Ashy Button Acleris sparsana (right), Bawdeswell, 6th October

 

click for larger image  

Red-green Carpet, Bawdeswell, 6th October

 

Friday 5th October

I decided to try a new mothing technique tonight, driving round quiet country lanes looking for moths in the full beam and then jumping out with a net to catch them, as well as parking up beside the road waiting for the headlights to attract things. It wasn't very successful - few moths were seen and nearly all that were seen didn't wait for me to get out of the car and catch them. None seemed to be attracted to the headlights when I stopped. I managed to catch just one, my first Green-brindled Crescent this year, outside Foxley Wood.

Back at home the MV light in the bedroom faired slightly better, pulling in a Black Rustic. This is a species I'm familiar with from holidays in Cornwall but although it's apparently becoming more widespread in this county this was my first in Norfolk. Others caught tonight were Common Marbled Carpet, Square-spot Rustic, Beaded Chestnut (my first this year), Lunar Underwing and Barred Sallow.

click for larger image click for larger image

Jay, east of Burnham Overy Town (left) and Green-brindled Crescent, Foxley Wood (right), 5th October - anyone want to take a view on the racial identity of the Jay? Lots of Continental birds on the move at the moment, but British ones are also more visible

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Beaded Chestnut (left) and Black Rustic (right), Bawdeswell, 5th October

 

Thursday 4th October

When I lived in Kent almost all of my birding was done at inland sites where I used to see Whinchats on passage at each of my inland patches on a reasonably regular basis. In the last 22 years I've lived in Norfolk I may not have spent quite such a high proportion of my time birding inland sites but I would have thought I'd spent enough time birding inland to have seen a few Whinchats. But no, until today I had never seen a Whinchat further inland in Norfolk than Upper Sheringham. Today in my lunch break I visited Raynham Lake (where there was nothing) and stopped off at Coxford and Tattersett on the way back. I've always thought Coxford looks good for chats, and have seen Stonechat there before, and today at last it produced a Whinchat. A bit distant so excuse the awful photo! Otherwise it was as birdless as Raynham - in fact I don't think I saw a single bird there apart from the chat!

Only one moth again tonight, but no complaints as it was a new one for me. Actually quite a common species with lots of records from all over Norfolk, but my first all the same: a Blair's Shoulder-knot.

click for larger image click for larger image

Whinchat, Coxford (left) and Empoasca decipiens, Bawdeswell (right), 4th October - thanks to Mick Ball for suggesting the leafhopper ID

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Blair's Shoulder-knot, Bawdeswell, 4th October

 

Wednesday 3rd October

A Little Owl called outside again this morning. The second time recently that I've heard it during daylight but I still can't see it - I think it's hanging out just round the corner of the neighbour's garden.

The nights aren't getting much better for moths but 2 Barred Sallows were colourful additions to the year-list (at least they would have been had I been keeping a year-list).

click for larger image click for larger image

Barred Sallows, Bawdeswell, 3rd October

 

Tuesday 2nd October

Still rubbish for moths: 2 Light Brown Apple Moths Epiphyas postvittana were all that turned up this evening.

 

Monday 1st October

Just 3 moths tonight: Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana, Common Marbled Carpet and Snout.

 

Next month: November 2012

Current month

Previous months:

2007: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul ; Aug ; Sep ; Oct ; Nov ; Dec ;

 

2008: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul ; Aug ; Sep ; Oct ; Nov ; Dec ;

 

2009: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul ; Aug ; Sep ; Oct ; Nov ; Dec ;

 

2010: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul ; Aug ; Sep ; Oct ; Nov ; Dec ;

 

2011: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul ; Aug ; Sep ; Oct ; Nov ; Dec ;

 

2012: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul ; Aug ; Sep