September 2012

 

Sunday 30th September

Only one moth again tonight - a Small Dusty Wave.

 

Saturday 29th September

Just a White-shouldered House-moth Endrosis sarcitrella tonight.

 

Friday 28th September

With south-westerly winds I hoped for some vis mig at Sheringham but I was disappointed - there was practically nothing moving. Lots of groups of geese flying east (presumably coming off roost rather than migrating, which of course is what I mean when I say moving!) - a total of at least 1400 Pink-footed Geese. At first I assumed that the lone single goose flying in off the sea and heading west was a Pink-foot too - after all it seemed quite short-necked and compact - but when I looked harder it showed a dark forewing! Now the forewing colour is not as simple a feature to use when identifying geese as the textbooks suggest as different light can create a different impression, but I watched this for a while and it seemed consistently dark. It must be a Tundra Bean Goose! It's really early for that - I've never seen one earlier than the second half of November before. I couldn't clearly make out the bare part colour and I completely forgot to check the tail pattern. I decided I wasn't going to get any more on it by looking so rattled off some photos, but unfortunately I underexposed them significantly and they're not as helpful as I expected. They do seem to confirm my field impressions though and although it isn't the most straightforward individual and I missed one of the key ID features altogether (the tail pattern), I think it was indeed a Tundra Bean Goose.

A Lapland Bunting was seen briefly but all in all it was pretty dire - 2 Wheatears were just about the only grounded migrants. Insects included half a dozen more Common Nettle-taps Anthophila fabriciana - seems to be a good year for these. On the way home I pulled in at Salthouse to have some lunch, seeing the escaped (or just possibly category C vagrant) Sacred Ibis while I munched on Cornish pasty and apple crumble cake from Weybourne.

Just 3 moths tonight, though that's 3 more than last night: Brown House-moth Hofmannophila pseudospretella and 2 Light Brown Apple Moths Epiphyas postvittana.

click for larger image click for larger image

Tundra Bean Goose, Sheringham, 28th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Rook, Sheringham, 28th September

 

click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image

Linnets, Sheringham, 28th September - a flock of at least 355 (counted from photos)

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Sparrowhawk (left) and Common Nettle-tap Anthophila fabriciana (right), Sheringham, 28th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image

presumed escaped Sacred Ibis, Salthouse, 28th September

 

Thursday 27th September

The day started with a peculiar sighting of a falcon-like shape flying up and down as if it was catching moths or something as it was just starting to get light. It was at the crossing between the B1110 and the B1354 between Pigg's Grave and Briningham - I can only presume it was an out-of-place migrant Nightjar. But I was driving and there was another car behind me so I couldn't stop easily, so it won't go down in the records. After all it might have been a Nighthawk. North westerly winds following the arrival of Atlantic depressions is the best weather for finding yank landbirds in Norfolk you know!

An interesting, if not very exciting, seawatch from Sheringham this morning. Seabirds weren't moving in huge numbers but there was enough to keep us interested for the first few hours. A total of 52 Great Skuas included a flock of 9 that kept on appearing and disappearing, while Artics numbered 14. Shearwaters included 2 Sooty and 4 Manx as well as a very close Balearic Shearwater that initially flew west through the surf and then it or another flew east just a little further out. We didn't see the Black Guillemot that was seen from Cley but we did get a Puffin. Among the Arctics was a party of 3 birds that landed on the sea just off the Leas. One of these was an interesting bird, seemingly a first-summer (or possibly a second-summer) and I'm not completely certain about its identity. Probably an Arctic but can we definitely rule out Long-tailed? Let me know what you think!

We also saw a Pomarine Skua fly east but in my rusty condition I failed to make a confident call on this at the time, despite everyone being in agreement that that's what it seemed to be. There are possibly more stringy claims of this species in Norfolk than anything else so I tend to feel like I should have the same level of proof before claiming a Pom as I would for a description species, and if this was a description species then I wouldn't be submitting a claim based on what I saw as it wasn't enough to put together an acceptable description. Nevertheless it's not a description species and there isn't any serious doubt in my mind that it was a Pom.

Otherwise not much of note - 50 Red-throated Divers and 75 Kittiwakes were perhaps worth a mention. It was a bit frustrating to hear news of the Sabine's Gull flying east past East Runton about 20 minutes after I left - I imagine it flew past Sheringham about 10 minutes after I left.

click for larger image

probable first-summer Arctic Skua (left) and Balearic Shearwater (right), Sheringham, 27th September - I'd be interested to hear your thoughts about the age and identity of the skua - there are more photos on my blog where you can also add your comments

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Kestrel, Bintree Mill, 27th September

 

Wednesday 26th September

With less wind today I returned to Burnham Overy for another attempt at the Booted Warbler. This was a success and the bird showed reasonably well, albeit never for long, several times. After a quick look for the Barred Warbler (which produced only Redstart and a couple of flyover Lapland Buntings) Dave and I moved on to Gun Hill where we found c15 Wheatear. Several small orange moths were flying around here and these proved to be my first Carnation Tortrices Cacoecimorpha pronubana; among these was a Yellow-spot Tortrix Pseudargyrotoza conwagana.

Tonight's moths at home were Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana, Small Dusty Wave, Garden Carpet, Square-spot Rustic and 2 Angle Shades.

click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image

Booted Warbler, Burnham Overy, 25th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Wheatear (left) and Redstart (right), Burnham Overy, 25th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Redshank (left) and Carnation Tortrix Cacoecimorpha pronubana (right), Burnham Overy, 25th September

 

Tuesday 25th September

Although one of the first birds seen this morning was a Firecrest, it was very quickly evident that the clear skies last night had resulted in a mass exodus of yesterday's migrants. Eventually I notched up 4 Redstarts and 2 Wheatears as well as the odd bird not seen yesterday like 2 Lesser Whitethroats. Another Brambling was heard and a few more Swallows were moving west (as well as single House and Sand Martin moving the other way). At sea a few birds were moving but far out and with the light harsh it felt like very hard work for not much reward, so I didn't give it long. An Arctic Skua was the best thing seen out to sea.

Some of the scarcer birds that turned up in the county were still around so once I'd finished on the patch I headed west. I paused very briefly at Blakeney where a very smart Redstart showed briefly. I didn't get a really good look at it but it gave the impression of being in spring plumage, complete with white forehead and bright plumage. Could it have failed to moult and still have been wearing its summer colours? Or are some adult males normally this gaudy even at this time of year? Didn't manage a photo unfortunately.

I've seen quite a few Red-breasted Flycatchers over the years, even found my own a few times, but I've never seen one with a red breast before. The adult male at Warham Greens was worth a look I felt, and I'm glad I did! A really stunning red-breasted Red-breasted Flycatcher! I think it was Martin P who said it was like seeing a new bird, and I concur! Awesome! It was quite mobile within a small area but showed well often enough when there weren't too many people moving around, and it often gave it's rattle. In the same little copse were Pied Flycatcher, Spotted Flycatcher and Redstart, and on the way back up the track, Garden Warbler.

I fancied seeing and photographing the Booted Warbler at Burnham Overy so gave this a go next. The strong wind was clearly not to its liking though and it remained extremely elusive. While I was there it was seen very briefly indeed in flight only. I got a glimpse but barely enough to see it was a small grey warbler let alone enough to identify it, and I eventually conceded that I was unlikely to get decent views or photos while the wind kept up. So instead of wasting my time twitching a bird I wasn't going to see I moved on to Gypsy Lane, Brancaster where I hoped to find some of my own migrants. This I failed to do, but I enjoyed 2 Spoonbills flying over.

I hadn't found any Common Nettle-taps Anthophila fabriciana at Sheringham today but there were at least 2 at Gypsy Lane. Other moths at home were Garden Carpet, Common Marbled Carpet, Grey Pine Carpet, Brimstone Moth and Snout.

click for larger image click for larger image

Red-breasted Flycatcher, Warham Greens, 25th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Redstart, Sheringham (left) and Pied Flycatcher, Warham Greens (right), 25th September

 

click for larger image

Spoonbills, Brancaster, 25th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Cormorant, Salthouse, 25th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Wren (left) and Whitethroat (right), Sheringham, 25th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Whitethroat, Sheringham (left) and Grey Plover, Burnham Overy (right), 25th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Wigeon (left) and Gadwall (right), Brancaster, 25th September

 

Monday 24th September

This morning was supposed to be overcast but dry, but it was raining when I got up and it continued raining most of the day. Consequently I changed my plans and started off at the Leas where, with the wind too far round to the east, I didn't expect many seabirds. A few duck were moving but true to expectations there weren't vast numbers of seabirds. Just single Arctic and Great Skuas were seen so I was pleased to pick out the star bird of the day, a Leach's Petrel heading east. Good numbers of terns were passing by too including an Arctic Tern.

Keen to find out what passerine migrants had been grounded Rob and I headed down to the wood where we quickly discoverd that migrants were arriving in force. Most hedges held 2-3 Redstarts - we got to 21 Redstarts in total, though I have no doubt that there were far more than this present during the day. Other migrants included 15 Wheatears, 7 Whinchats, Tree Pipit, Spotted Flycatcher, Brambling, Garden Warbler, 3 Whitethroats, 2 Chiffchaffs, 2 Blackcaps, 2 Blackcaps, Robins and Song Thrushes, but despite hammering the patch until the rain become too heavy to continue after 3 pm we failed to find any really scarce migrants. Still, really enjoyable birding and although numbers weren't massive it had all the feel of a proper fall.

Insects included a Speckled Wood and well over 100 Common Nettle-taps Anthophila fabriciana but at home tonight the only moth was a Setaceous Hebrew Character.

click for larger image click for larger image

Red-throated Divers (left) and Redstart (right), Sheringham, 24th September

 

Sunday 23rd September

We travelled back from Cheltenham in heavy rain which continued throughout the evening. Given the cold wet conditions I didn't expect any moths but a Square-spot Rustic, Lunar Underwing and Vine's Rustic had other ideas.

click for larger image click for larger image

Lunar Underwing (left) and Vine's Rustic (right), Bawdeswell, 23rd September

 

Saturday 22nd September

A promising forecast for migrants turning up in Norfolk this weekend was bound to coincide with prior plans to be out of the county! I had arranged to collect Vitty from Bath where she's been for most of the week this afternoon and then go on to Cheltenham where we would stay with friends tonight. We had been thinking of heading down to Cornwall for a week, so this would have been en route, but with nothing booked we retained the option of going elsewhere or returning home for a week chilling in Norfolk. Anyway, I figured I had plenty of time to see the Baillon's Crake in London and the Short-billed Dowitcher in Dorset and still get to Bath by 4.00, so I rolled up at Rainham Marshes bright and early (well, dark and early). It soon was bright though, and as the juvenile Baillon's Crake began to show the sun rose directly behind it. Over the next 2-3 hours it showed incredibly well and gave fantastic views, but with the sun where it was pulling of decent photos was beyond my ability!

Baillon's Crake wasn't a UK first for me but I did get a UK first at Rainham Marshes. I didn't see it but I'm pretty certain the frog I heard calling briefly was a Marsh Frog, an introduced species that seems to be on the increase. Apart from 3 Greenshanks and a Water Rail I didn't see much else of note here (I didn't bother looking for the Yellow-browed Warbler).

Having enjoyed the Crake I left a little later than I'd planned but there should still have been enough time to get down to Weymouth to see the Dowitcher. Four hours later I was still parked in traffic on the M25 and it was pretty obvious that I wasn't going to get anywhere en route to Bath, let alone Weymouth. The M4 did at least produce a Red Kite, though that was hardly compensation (especially as all the while I was hearing about new scarce birds being found in Norfolk)! Still, a nice evening spent with Rob and Petra.

click for larger image click for larger image
click for larger image click for larger image

Baillon's Crake, Rainham Marshes, 22nd September

 

Friday 21st September

Heard both Treecreeper and Little Owl whilst waking up this morning - have still never seen Little Owl from the house and I think it's only the second or third time I've recorded Treecreeper here.

Fortunately Connor was both paying closer attention to the weather forecast than me and kindly gave me the heads up of a potential afternoon sea watch. So I headed up to the coast this afternoon expecting a fair, though probably not amazing, sea passage. Holme was turning up scarce passerines, a bit surprisingly, so I decided to start off with a stomp round the Sheringham patch. There wasn't much evidence of grounded passerine migrants though: 2-3 Chiffchaffs moving inland up the hedgerows were clearly new in, and the fields were full of Meadow Pipits, but that was about the lot. Not weather for mothing but a Common Nettle-tap Anthophila fabriciana braved the wind and rain. I seawatched from the pillboxes for a while before having a further stomp round and then heading off to the Leas to focus properly on the sea. It was quite lively really, given that the wind wasn't especially strong. Mainly Gannets, of which Connor counted over 1400 (a good count), but there were some more interesting seabirds too, if nothing rare. A close Puffin was best, while a count of 117 Great Skuas was remarkable (again Connor's count - I saw around 70 of them), especially as there were so few other skuas (I saw just 2 Arctic Skuas). Other bits and pieces included 8 Manx Shearwaters, 2 Little Gulls and an adult Shag.

After fish & chips at Holt I arrived home, opened my window to the cold northerly wind and lashing rain, turned on the light and expected nothing. 30 seconds later in fluttered a Common Marbled Carpet, probably glad to find somewhere relatively warm and dry! A Garden Rose Tortrix Acleris variegana followed a bit later, along with a Square-spot Rustic.

click for larger image  

Garden Rose Tortrix Acleris variegana, Bawdeswell, 21st September

 

Thursday 20th September

19 moths is the best showing for a few days. A Copper Underwing sp. was interesting, seemingly showing some characters of Svensson's Copper Underwing (which would be my first) but not being entirely convincing in its very worn state. See what you think if you know these better than I do and let me know! Otherwise there was White-shouldered House-moth Endrosis sarcitrella, 2 Light Brown Apple Moths Epiphyas postvittana, 2 Small Dusty Waves, 2 Common Marbled Carpets, Brimstone Moth, 3 Light Emeralds, Setaceous Hebrew Character, Clay, Vine's Rustic, Burnished Brass, 2 Silver Ys and Snout.

click for larger image click for larger image

Burnished Brass (left) and Common Marbled Carpet (right), Bawdeswell, 20th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Copper Underwing sp., Bawdeswell, 20th September - front-on the palps looked pretty uniformly pale, suggesting Copper Underwing, but from the side the pale tips contrasted clearly against the darker sides, more like Svensson's - Jon tells me the palps aren't so useful when the moth is worn, and this moth was very worn!

 

click for larger image  

Copper Underwing sp., Bawdeswell, 20th September - the underwing pattern seems to favour Svensson's, but not sure how reliable that is when it's in such a worn state

 

Wednesday 19th September

Well I promised you some birds soon so with some time off work this week I've cleared some chores that should free me up to get out a bit. I started off with a wander round Swanton Morley this evening but it was dire, and I resorted to counting geese (295 Greylags, 83 Canadas and 23 Egyptian). That was, though only just, a record count of Canadas for me at this site - does that make it exciting? No, I didn't think so. A brief glimpse of a Barn Owl and a frequently-calling but always invisible Kingfisher were the next nearest thing to excitement.

Only 2 moths again: Square-spot Rustic and Brindled Green.

click for larger image  

Brindled Green, Bawdeswell, 19th September

 

Tuesday 18th September

Just 2 moths tonight - a White-shouldered House-moth Endrosis sarcitrella and my first Lunar Underwing of the year.

click for larger image  

Lunar Underwing, Bawdeswell, 18th September

 

Monday 17th September

Tonight I recorded Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana, Small Dusty Wave, Garden Carpet, Green Carpet, Brimstone Moth, 2 Square-spot Rustics, White-point, Centre-barred Sallow and Snout.

click for larger image  

White-point, Bawdeswell, 17th September

 

Sunday 16th September

Following one at Webourne yesterday, a Flounced Rustic was my first at home this year; others moths tonight were 2 Garden Carpets, Green Carpet, 2 Brimstone Moths, 5 Square-spot Rustics and Snout.

 

Saturday 15th September

This evening I joined the Norfolk Moth Survey event at Weybourne Heath where the clear skies and cool temperatures kept a firm cap on the number of moths recorded. Still, it was enjoyable enough and several reasonably interesting moths were recorded including two I'd not seen before: Square-spot Crest Hypatima rhomboidella and Pine Carpet. The rest were White-shouldered Smudge Ypsolopha parenthesella, presumed Black-headed Dwarf Elachista atricomella, Dingy Dowd Blastobasis adustella, 1-2 White-faced Tortrices Pandemis cinnamomeana, 2 Common Marbles Celypha lacunana, Small Birch Bell Epinotia ramella, 2-3 Grey Poplar Bells Epinotia nisella, a very late Garden Grass-veneer Chrysoteuchia culmella, 3 Ground-moss Greys Eudonia truncicolella, 2 Dark Pine Knot-horns Dioryctria abietella, Single-dotted Wave, Riband Wave, Common Marbled Carpet, 3 Grey Pine Carpets, 8+ Green Carpets, 2 Brimstone Moths, 2 Canary-shouldered Thorns, 8+ Light Emeralds, Large Yellow Underwing, 2 Setaceous Hebrew Characters, 2 Square-spot Rustics, Pink-barred Sallow, presumed Copper Underwing, Angle Shades, Flounced Rustic and 6 Straw Dots.

Back at home just 7 moths included my third ever Rhomboid Tortrix Acleris rhombana; the others were Diamond-back Moth Plutella xylostella, White-shouldered House-moth Endrosis sarcitrella, Common Pliume Emmelina monodactyla, Garden Carpet, Green Carpet and Snout.

click for larger image click for larger image

Pink-barred Sallow (left) and Canary-shouldered Thorn (right), Weybourne Heath, 15th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Pine Carpet (left) and Grey Pine Carpet (right), Weybourne Heath, 15th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Frosted Orange (left) and Flounced Rustic (right), Weybourne Heath, 15th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

White-shouldered Smudge Ypsolopha parenthesella (left) and Square-spot Crest Hypatima rhomboidella (right), Weybourne Heath, 15th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Dark Pine Knot-horn Dioryctria abietella (left) and White-faced Tortrix Pandemis cinnamomeana (right), Weybourne Heath, 15th September - lacking a white face despite its name (because it's a female)

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Grey Poplar Bells Epinotia nisella, Weybourne Heath, 15th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

probable Grey Poplar Bell Epinotia nisella (left) and Small Birch Bell Epinotia ramella (right), Weybourne Heath, 15th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Rhomboid Tortrix Acleris rhombana (left) and Diamond-back Moth Plutella xylostella (right), Bawdeswell, 15th September

 

Friday 14th September

A few more moths tonight as the wind died down a bit, best of which was my first ever Marsh Grey Eudonia pallida (the only micro tonight). The macros were Garden Carpet, Brimstone Moth, Light Emerald, 3 Square-spot Rustics and Silver Y.

click for larger image  

Marsh Grey Eudonia pallida, Bawdeswell, 14th September

 

Thursday 13th September

Three times as many moths as yesterday... 2 Brown House-moths Hofmannophila pseudospretella and a very worn Clay.

 

Wednesday 12th September

A single Silver Y was the only moth in this evening.

 

Tuesday 11th September

I'm feeling quite optimistic that I will once again have some time free for birding before very long, so those of you who are tired of seeing nothing but moths will hopefully have something else to read about before very long... hang in there! Not just yet though.

Falling temperatures ensured even fewer moths but I wasn't complaining as one of the few was a first for me: Hawthorn Argent Argyresthia bonnetella. Others were Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana, Narrow-winged Grey Eudonia angustea, 2 Garden Carpets, Green Carpet, Brimstone Moth, Large Yellow Underwing, 3 Square-spot Rustics, Angle Shades and Snout.

click for larger image  

Hawthorn Argent Argyresthia bonnetella, Bawdeswell, 11th September

 

Monday 10th September

A fairly meagre showing of moths tonight: Clothes Moth sp. Tinea or Niditinea sp., 2 Brown House-moths Hofmannophila pseudospretella, presumed Dark-triangle Button Acleris laterana, Narrow-winged Grey Eudonia angustea, Mother of Pearl, 3 Garden Carpets, 2 Green Carpets, 2 Setaceous Hebrew Characters, 3 Square-spot Rustics and 2 Silver Ys.

click for larger image click for larger image

presumed Dark-triangle Button Acleris laterana (left) and unidentified midge (right), Bawdeswell, 10th September

 

Sunday 9th September

An interesting night for moths with a few things of note, though nothing very exceptional. Most surprising was a Common Nettle-tap Anthophila fabriciana, normally a day-flying species that I've saw in my garden earlier this year but have never had in the house (nor at a light anywhere else). Brindled Green was new for the year, and very nice too. My second Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing in a week was notable as was a record count of 5 Common Marbled Carpets. Otherwise there was Cork Moth Nemapogon cloacella, Clothes Moth sp. Tinea or Niditinea sp., 2 Brown House-moths Hofmannophila pseudospretella, presumed Dark-triangle Button Acleris laterana, Garden Rose Tortrix Acleris variegana, 2 Garden Carpets, 7 Green Carpets, 10 Brimstone Moths, Lesser Yellow Underwing, Setaceous Hebrew Character, 9 Square-spot Rustics, Cabbage Moth and Burnished Brass.

click for larger image click for larger image

Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing, Bawdeswell, 9th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Brindled Green (left) and Common Nettle-tap Anthophila fabriciana (right), Bawdeswell, 9th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Cabbage Moth (left) and Garen Rose Tortrix Acleris variegana (right), Bawdeswell, 9th September

 

Saturday 8th September

A Migrant Hawker graced the garden this afternoon and then tonight's haul consisted of Brown House-moth Hofmannophila pseudospretella, 2 White-shouldered House-moths Endrosis sarcitrella, Common Marble Celypha lacunana, Small Dusty Wave, 3 Garden Carpets, Common Marbled Carpet, 6 Green Carpets, 8 Brimstone Moths, yesterday's Dusky Thorn reappeared, Light Emerald, Large Yellow Underwing, Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing (only my second here), Setaceous Hebrew Character, 11 Square-spot Rustics, 3 Angle Shades (never had 3 in one night before), 2 Silver Ys, Straw Dot and 2 Snouts.

click for larger image  

Migrant Hawker, Bawdeswell, 8th September

 

Friday 7th September

Quite a good night for moths, especially given the clear skies that aren't usually conducive to good mothing. Best was my first ever Dusky Thorn but a couple of other macros were species I don't record often: Mouse Moth was only my second at home and Vine's Rustic is one I don't get every year.

The rest were Firethorn Leaf Miner Phyllonorycter leucographella, 3 Brown House-moths Hofmannophila pseudospretella, Brindled Flat-body Agonopterix arenella, Mother of Pearl Pleuroptya ruralis, Beautiful Plume Amblyptilia acanthadactyla, Common Plume Emmelina monodactyla, 2 Small Dusty Waves, 2 Single-dotted Waves, Garden Carpet, Common Marbled Carpet, 2 Green Carpets, 8 Brimtstone Moths, Light Emerald, 2 Flame Shoulders, Large Yellow Underwing, Setaceous Hebrew Character, 16 Square-spot Rustics and 8 Silver Ys.

click for larger image click for larger image

Dusky Thorn, Bawdeswell, 7th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Vine's Rustic (left) and Mouse Moth (right), Bawdeswell, 7th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Firethorn Leaf Miner Phyllonorycter leucographella (left) and Common Marbled Carpet (right), Bawdeswell, 7th September - the last 6 Common Marbled Carpets I've had have all been of this smart orange-patched form whereas the 7 I saw earlier in the year were darker forms

 

Thursday 6th September

A little bit more variety than there's been in some recent nights: Dingy Tubic Borkhausenia fuscescens, Brown House-moth Hofmannophila pseudospretella, Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana, presumed Dark-triangle Button Acleris laterana, Rush Marble Bactra lancealana, 2 Mother of Pearls Pleuroptya ruralis, 2 Small Dusty Waves, 2 Garden Carpets, 3 Common Marbled Carpets (though a species I record frequently I've never had 3 in one night at home before), Green Carpet, 7 Brimstone Moths, 2 Light Emeralds, 4 Square-spot Rustics, probable Copper Underwing, Burnished Brass, 6 Silver Ys and Snout.

click for larger image click for larger image

Garden Carpet (left) and presumed Dark-triangle Button Acleris laterana (right), Bawdeswell, 6th September - the Acleris needs gen detting to eliminate Strawberry Tortrix Acleris comariana but the latter is though to be scarce and some of my past records at this time of year have been proven laterana

 

click for larger image  

Carrot Psyllid Trioza apicalis , Bawdeswell, 6th September - apparently this tiny (c. 3mm) and innoculous-looking insect is a serious pest of carrot crops

 

Wednesday 5th September

Popped in to Raynham Lake in my lunch break where I was surprised to find the lake, at least the part visible from the road, was completely dry. The goose flock contained the same hybrid that's been around for a few years, presumed to be Barnacle x White-fronted Goose.

For the last couple of years or so I've been potting up the moths that arrive in my bedroom during the evening and then releasing them in the morning. I've often wondered whether I sometimes get the same moths returning during the following or subsequent evenings but as I've never had a distinctive individually-recognisable moth reappear a second time I've tended to assume that doesn't happen very often, if at all (except the house-loving House-moths which it's hard enough to stop coming straight back as soon as they're released!). Well yesterday's Lesser Yellow Underwing was pretty distinctive having a very weak oval and a large square-shaped piece of its left wing missing. I let it out in the morning before going to work and this evening an identical Lesser Yellow Underwing turned up, surely the same individual. Not much else really: Brown House-moth Hofmannophila pseudospretella, Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana, 2 Common Marbled Carpets, 2 Green Carpets, 4 Brimstone Moths, Large Yellow Underwing, 6 Square-spot Rustics, 2 Angle Shades and Silver Y.

click for larger image click for larger image

Common Marbled Carpet (left) and Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana (right), Bawdeswell, 5th September

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Angle Shades, Bawdeswell, 5th September - 2 in a night is unusual for me

 

Tuesday 4th September

A much better night for moths compared to recent nights, especially thanks to a Bindweed Bent-wing Bedellia somnulentella. There have been just 3 previous records of this species in Norfolk and at least 2 of those were larvae (the other isn't specified).

Other moths I don't see all that often were Sharp-winged Drill Dichrorampha acuminitana and Small Rivulet. I'd never seen the latter outside of July and although August records aren't unusual September is certainly on the late side. The rest were Cork Moth Nemapogon cloacella, 4 Brown House-moths Hofmannophila pseudospretella, probable Common Flat-body Agonopterix heracliana, 4 Light Brown Apple Moths Epiphyas postvittana, Narrow-winged Grey Eudonia angustea, Bee Moth Aphomia sociella, Single-dotted Wave, 2 Green Carpets, 6 Brimstone Moths, Light Emerald, Flame Shoulder, Lesser Yellow Underwing, 8 Square-spot Rustics, Burnished Brass and 11 Silver Ys.

click for larger image click for larger image

Bindweed Bent-wing Bedellia somnulentella (left) and Sharp-winged Drill Dichrorampha acuminitana (right), Bawdeswell, 4th September

 

click for larger image  

Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana, Bawdeswell, 4th September - I know these are really variable but the majority of recent examples have all been the same - not tonight though - they were all different from each other and from the form that's been typical of late. I can't find any illustrations or photos that look quite like this one but I assume the ID is correct - let me know if I've overlooked something though!

 

Monday 3rd September

A Centre-barred Sallow was new for the year this evening. The rest were Fulvous Clothes Moth Tinea semifulvella, 3 Brown House-moths Hofmannophila pseudospretella, Mother of Pearl Pleuroptya ruralis, Common Plume Emmelina monodactyla, Single-dotted Wave, 5 Green Carpets, 8 Brimstone Moths, Setaceous Hebrew Character, 7 Square-spot Rustics, 7 Silver Ys and Straw Dot.

click for larger image click for larger image

Silver Y (left) and Centre-barred Sallow (right), Bawdeswell, 3rd September

 

click for larger image  

Vine Weevil, Bawdeswell, 3rd September

 

Sunday 2nd September

Even fewer moths included 2 Brown House-moths Hofmannophila pseudospretella, Common Marble Celypha lacunana, Mother of Pearl Pleuroptya ruralis, Beautiful Plume Amblyptilia acanthadactyla, 2 Small Dusty Waves, 3 Green Carpets, 3 Brimstone Moths, 5 Square-spot Rustics and 3 Silver Ys.

 

Saturday 1st September

Relatively little excitement on the moth front again tonight: Carrion Moth Monopis weaverella, 4 Brown House-moths Hofmannophila pseudospretella, Heather Tortrix Argyrotaenia ljungiana, Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana, Pearl Veneer Agriphila straminella, 3 Mother of Pearls Pleuroptya ruralis, 2 Small Dusty Waves, Single-dotted Wave, Garden Carpet, 12 Green Carpets, Yellow-barred Brindle, 4 Brimstone Moths, 2 Setaceous Hebrew Characters, 3 Square-spot Rustics, Angle Shades, 7 Silver Ys and Straw Dot.

 

Next month: October 2012

Current month

Previous months:

2007: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul ; Aug ; Sep ; Oct ; Nov ; Dec ;

 

2008: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul ; Aug ; Sep ; Oct ; Nov ; Dec ;

 

2009: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul ; Aug ; Sep ; Oct ; Nov ; Dec ;

 

2010: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul ; Aug ; Sep ; Oct ; Nov ; Dec ;

 

2011: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul ; Aug ; Sep ; Oct ; Nov ; Dec ;

 

2012: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul ; Aug