August 2014

 

Sunday 31st August

A clear night ensured few moths tonight, but among the few was a nice Eyed Hawkmoth. These impressive beasties are supposed to fly between May and July, so one on the last night of August was a bit of a surprise. Also Rosy Rustic, Six-striped Rustic and 2 Centre-barred Sallows.

click for larger image click for larger image

Collared Doves, North Elmham, 31st August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Eyed Hawkmoth (left) and Rosy Rustic (right), North Elmham, 31st August - perhaps not the finest specimen of an Eyed Hawkmoth you'll ever see, but what do you expect a month after they're supposed to stop flying?

 

Saturday 30th August

The best morning at the inland patch for ages! None of the first 3 sites I checked held anything of note but from Rawhall Wood I could see a field containing some gulls in the distance. One looked good for Yellow-legged Gull so I drove down the road to get a closer view. Among 8-10 Lesser Black-backed Gulls there were 2 Yellow-legged Gulls - a new bird for the patch! As I alerted Dave they promptly flew off towards Creaking Gate Lake, so I headed there next. No sign of the gulls but an eclipse drake Mandarin was the first I've seen at this site. A Kingfisher sped by as I watched a young Little Grebe chick and then I heard a Nuthatch calling - Dave has seen them here before but this was another patch tick for me. A moth I kicked up from beneath my feet proved to be my first ever Notch-winged Button Acleris emargana.

Hell Pit held a surprisingly large party of at least 29 Tufted Ducks - a shallow pool that doesn't normally hold any diving duck - I think 3 is the most I've seen here before. There were a similar number with a Pochard on nearby Poplar Lake, but less unusual there. A Hobby was hawking over the trees at the back of the lake, rounding off the morning nicely.

Last week I hadn't gone to the mothing event at Bryant's Heath near North Walsham, which is a good job as (a) they only saw 13 moths in the cold and (b) there had been a mix up with the dates so none of the locals who it was organised for turned up. A decision was made to repeat the event this evening, which was when the locals had been expecting us to turn up, and this time I went along. It proved to be an excellent night despite lots of Hornets and I was very happy to see no less than 5 new species, plus another Notch-wing Button Acleris emargana that I had seen for the first time only this morning. The new ones were Gorse Flat-body Agonopterix umbellana, Gorse Groundling Mirificarma mulinella, Dark Grass-veneer Crambus hamella (we saw 4 in the end), White-streak Grass-veneer Agriphila latistria and Hedge Rustic. Other highlights included Yellow-triangle or New Oak Slender Caloptilia alchimiella or robustella, White-shouldered Smudge Ypsolopha parenthesella, Large Groundling Teleiopsis diffinis, Heather Groundling Neofaculta ericetella, Chequered Fruit-tree Tortrix Pandemis corylana, 3 White-faced Tortrices Pandemis cinnamomeana, White-shouldered Marble Apotomis turbidana, 4 Small Birch Bells Epinotia ramella, Maiden's Blush, 2 Lesser Swallow Prominents, Vapourer, Turnip Moth and Old Lady. Oh, and a Shieldbug tick too... Bronze Shielldbug.

At home the moth trap was rather less productive! A Sharp-angled Carpet looked suspiciously like (so presumably was) yesterday's individual and otherwise the best were Fulvous Clothes Moth Tinea semifulvella (new for the house), Common Birch Bell Epinotia immundana, 2 Poplar Hawkmoths, Swallow Prominent, Six-striped Rustic and Centre-barred Sallow (new for the year).

click for larger image click for larger image

Mandarin, Creaking Gate Lake, 30th August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Southern Hawker, Creaking Gate Lake, 30th August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Notch-wing Buttons Acleris emargana, Creaking Gate Lake (left) and Bryant's Heath (right), 30th August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Dark Grass-veneers Crambus hamella, Bryant's Heath, 30th August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Small Birch Bells Epinotia ramella, Bryant's Heath, 30th August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Vapourer, Bryant's Heath, 30th August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

White-streak Grass-veneer Agriphila latistria (left) and Hedge Rustic (right), Bryant's Heath, 30th August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Gorse Flat-body Agonopterix umbellana (left) and White-shouldered Smudge Ypsolopha parenthesella (right), Bryant's Heath, 30th August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

White-faced Tortrices (or Tortrixes?) Pandemis cinnamomeana, Bryant's Heath, 30th August

 

Friday 29th August

Best of tonight's moths was a Sharp-angled Carpet, a species I never saw at Bawdeswell. Otherwise a Metzneria sp. was too intermediate to call, either Burdock Neb Metzneria lappella or Meadow Neb Metzneria metzneriella, and there was Marbled Piercer Cydia splendana, Dotted Oak Knot-horn Phycita roborella, 2 Blood-veins, Canary-shouldered Thorn, Poplar Hawkmoth, Square-spotted Clay, Nutmeg and 2 White-points. The only species in double-figures was 13 Elbow-stripe Grass-veneers Agriphila geniculea.

click for larger image click for larger image

Long-tailed Tit, North Elmham, 29th August

 

Thursday 28th August

While going through last night's catch (see yesterday's entry below) a Whimbrel flew over calling - didn't see it but a handy addition to the new house list nonetheless. Another attempt to see migrants in my lunch break at Thornham produced only Migrant Hawkers, though I wish I'd managed to get a better look at the large egret-like bird that landed on the saltmarsh in the distance - did wonder if it might be Great White Egret, but couldn't see it well enough. Changed position so I wasn't looking through the windscreen but from that position I couldn't see it at all. Later a Great White was seen there, and I reckon that's very probably what I saw.

Tonight's moths were less exciting than yesterday, including Golden Argent Argyresthia goedartella, 11 Elbow-stripe Grass-veneers Agriphila geniculea, Canary-shouldered Thorn, Poplar Hawkmoth, 2 Six-striped Rustics, 2 Copper Underwings, Angle Shades, 20 Flounced Rustics and Rosy Rustic.

 

Wednesday 27th August

A hunt for migrants birds in my lunch break produced only Migrant Hawkers and a couple of Lesser Whitethroats. A Brown Plume Stenoptilia pterodactyla was in the garden at dusk, when I also discovered a Vapourer caterpillar climbing up the back door.

A warm cloudy dry night was just what the doctor ordered and come the morning the moth trap was bursting. An Orange Sallow was a very smart, if perhaps belated, new moth for me. Better than that and a great surprise was another Italian Tubic Metalampra italica - this was the moth that was new to Norfolk when one was photographed in a trap at Titchwell in late July and I had one confirmed at my old house at the beginning of this month - so this is the third for Norfolk! If only the Titchwell photo hadn't emerged then my two records would have been firsts for each vice-county, as my new house is just across the vice-county border between east and west Norfolk!

Other interesting moths included Purple Argent Argyresthia albistria, 2 Small Birch Bells Epinotia ramella, Common Birch Bell Epinotia immundana, Grey Poplar Bell Epinotia nisella, 2 Red Piercers Lathronympha strigana, 3 Chinese Characters, 3 Blood-veins, Dark-barred Twin-spot Carpet, Grey Pine Carpet, Lime-speck Pug, Currant Pug, 3 Treble-bars, Canary-shouldered Thorn, Dusky Thorn, 2 Poplar Hawkmoths, Swallow Prominent, Turnip Moth, Square-spotted Clay, 3 Copper Underwings, Mouse Moth and 6 Vine's Rustics, while numbers were provided by 15 Elbow-stripe Grass-veneers Agriphila geniculea, 16 Brimstone Moths, 13 Flame Shoulders, 30 Large Yellow Underwings, 12 Setaceous Hebrew Characters, 16 Square-spot Rustics and 12 Flounced Rustics.

click for larger image click for larger image

Lesser Whitethroat, Thornham (left) and Nut Weevil Curculio nucum, North Elmham (right), 27th August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Orange Sallow (left) and Italian Tubic Metalampra italica (right), North Elmham, 27th August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Grey Poplar Bell Epinotia nisella (left) and Common Birch Bell Epinotia immundana (right), North Elmham, 27th August

 

Tuesday 26th August

A greater number of moths tonight despite clearer skies but slightly less variety - 109 of 27 species. They included 9 Elbow-stripe Grass-veneers Agriphila geniculea, 2 Blood-veins, 2 Treble-bars, Canary-shouldered Thorn, Light Emerald, 3 Lesser Yellow Underwings, 2 Six-striped Rustics, White-point and 21 Flounced Rustics.

 

Monday 25th August

What with the frozen shoulder keeping me out of action for most of the spring and early summer, and then moving house, I haven't had much chance to go birding in ages. Today I did have a chance, though not for an early start and the weather forecast was miserable. I headed up to Burnham Overy arriving about 10ish, which I hoped would pan out well - I would get some time birding before the rain set in and I would still be there when the rain downed hordes of migrants. Well I was half right, but by the time I'd got soaked through there was still no sign of any big fall of migrants. I wasn't really surprised - the wind was just moving east from south-east but it would be later before it went round to the NE. A few migrants were down - a couple of Wheatears, a Whinchat, and as a I walked back, 3 Yellow Wagtails. Also lots of hirundines and Swifts around (mainly Swallows), streaming east when I first arrived, and just milling around afterwards. Other birds moving included a couple of Green Sandpipers. A flock of 14 Spoonbills was on the reedy pool.

A group of terns at the river mouth included a bird with patchy black underparts. For a second I assumed it was a moulting adult Black Tern, but as I took a closer look to eliminate Whiskered Tern (as the pattern recalled that a bit) I realised that the size, structure and flight was rather too similar to the Common Terns there. This was no marsh tern, so why so dark on the underparts? It was a fully dark-capped adult but showed quite a dark bill compared to other adults nearby. Thoughts of Eastern Common Tern went through my mind and as I tried to recall the features to look for I noticed it also showed darker inner lesser coverts on the underwing creating a sort of pale panel in the centre of the underwing. I had a feeling this was a feature of White-cheeked Tern and might have started getting a bit excited had it not been for the fact that by this time I was starting to clock that the dark on the underparts were a bit odd in shape. I don't think the dark underparts was a plumage feature at all - I think it was oiling, or some kind of contamination, and the bird was then just a straightforward Common Tern.

Rain throughout the night would have put off some people from trapping but when you have a wood store to keep the trap dry there's no need to give up because of a bit of rain. Good job I didn't as it proved a better night, with 77 moths of 35 species. Among them was a Rush Veneer Nomophila noctuella, a migrant that is supposed to be common, but which I hadn't seen in Norfolk before. Others new for the house were Brown Rowan Argent Argyresthia semifusca, Wax Moth Galleria mellonella and Ermine Knot-horn Phycitodes binaevella. Also Small Birch Bell Epinotia ramella, Treble-bar, Dusky Thorn, Swallow Prominent, Square-spotted Clay, 2 Six-striped Rustics and Rosy Rustic.

click for larger image click for larger image

Pochard (left) and Sea Spurge (right), Burnham Overy, 25th August - a flower tick I think

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Rush Veneer Nomophila noctuella (left) and Wax Moth Galleria mellonella (right), North Elmham, 25th August

 

click for larger image  

Brown Rowan Argent Argyresthia semifusca, North Elmham, 25th August

 

Sunday 24th August

A few more moths tonight, with a warmer cloudy night, though 62 moths of 26 species was not as many as I had hoped for. Among them Skin Moth Monopis laevigella, Sharp-winged Drill Dichrorampha acuminatana, Narrow-winged Grey Eudonia angustea and 2 Mouse Moths were new for the house. Otherwise Coxcomb Prominent and Swallow Prominent were the best.

click for larger image  

Coxcomb Prominent, North Elmham, 24th August

 

Saturday 23rd August

Good to see Webber finally getting hitched today, and nice to see @Norwichbirder at the wedding. A cold clear night ensured a nearly empty moth trap in the morning - just 18 moths, half of which were Flounced Rustics. An Iron Prominent and 2 Lesser Yellow Underwings were the closest things to highlights.

click for larger image click for larger image

Lesser Yellow Underwing (left) and Iron Prominent (right), North Elmham, 23rd August

 

Friday 22nd August

Popped in to the patch on the way in to work. Nothing exciting happening there, though a count of 793 Greylag Geese is the highest I've made there. I could here a Little Owl calling from my study at dusk, but couldn't see it in the half-light.

A warmer cloudier start to the night promised to be better for moths, evidenced by the arrival inside the house of a few (e.g. Dark Groundling Bryotropha affinis and both House-moths). During and immediately after a shower just after dusk I could see moths buzzing around by the trap so I had high hopes for the trap despite knowing it had cleared up soon after and the temperatures had plummeted. Sadly my hopes were false and there were very few moths in the trap at all, though they included another nice Poplar Hawkmoth. Moth of the night was outside the trap, a Clay Triple-lines. I've only seen them once or twice before and I'd not seen second generation examples before - these are much more like Mochas (well, Blair's Mocha especially) than I had realised, and with this one having dark-edged pale spots on both fore and hindwings I did start to wonder for a while. In the end I was satisfied that my first impression had been right, and Clay Triple-lines it was.

click for larger image click for larger image

Clay Triple-lines (left) and Poplar Hawkmoth (right), North Elmham, 22nd August

 

Thursday 21st August

A much better night for moths thanks to a bit of cloud. Migrants included 2 Diamond-back Moths Plutella xylostella and my first Rusty-dot Pearl Udea ferrugalis of the year. I was a bit surprised to find 5 Common Wainscots in the trap - I've found them to be rather scarce in the last 2-3 years and have never seen this many together before - they are the start of a second-generation this year. One moth that I'm finding to be much commoner here than it ever was at Bawdeswell is Elbow-striped Grass-veneer Agriphila geniculea - never had more than singles at Bawdeswell but have had several here most nights in the past week and 8 tonight.

 

Wednesday 20th August

Found some pics on my DSLR that I'd forgotten I'd taken over the move - the Dunnock came into the bedroom in Bawdeswell when we were trying to get packed up the night before we moved out - it should have been tucked up in bed at that time of night, but not my bed.

Another poor night for moths due to cold clear conditions but Sallow Kitten and Swallow Prominent were smart new additions to the new house list. Like last week's Lesser Swallow Prominent, the Swallow Prominent was a species that I had never recorded in the previous house.

click for larger image click for larger image

Dunnock, Bawdeswell, 8th August (left) and Blackbird, North Elmham, 16th August (right)

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Swallow Prominent (left) and Sallow Kitten (right), North Elmham, 20th August

 

Tuesday 19th August

A cold night so not nearly as many moths as there have been, and especially few smaller ones (no Geometers for example). Nevertheless Square-spotted Clay would have been good in a normal year (but this was my 12th this month), and Poplar Hawkmoth and Frosted Orange were nice.

 

Monday 18th August

The new house is nearer the patch so I hope to pop in more often now. I did so this morning on the way to work, albeit not for long. Highlight was a nice Kingfisher.

With the possible exception of 2 Poplar Hawkmoths, the smartest moth tonight was a Frosted Orange - one I never managed to see at Bawdeswell. A Dusky Groundling Aroga velocella was less impressive but probably a better record. Otherwise Coxcomb Prominent, Lesser Yellow Underwing, Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing and 4 Vine's Rustics were the highlights.

click for larger image click for larger image

Frosted Orange (left) and Dusky Groundling Aroga velocella (right), North Elmham, 18th August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Coxcomb Prominent (left) and Poplar Hawkmoth (right), North Elmham, 18th August

 

Sunday 17th August

Fewer moths tonight, though that was in part due to the Blackbirds that have now figured out that the moth trap is a source of food. More Blackbirds than moths around the outside of the trap this morning! Rhomboid Tortrix Acleris rhombana was new for the year and another tortrix was too worn to tell if it was Chamomile Conch Cochylidia implicitana or Blue-fleabane Conch Cochylidia heydeniana - either would be new for the year, heydeniana would be my first ever. Also Wainscot Smudge Ypsolopha scabrella, Canary-shouldered Thorn, Poplar Hawkmoth, Lychnis, Angle Shades and Vine's Rustic.

click for larger image click for larger image

Canary-shouldered Thorn (left) and Chequered Grass-veneer Catoptria falsella (right), North Elmham, 17th August

 

Saturday 16th August

I had hoped to go to the Bird Fair today but still too much needing sorting with the new house. That meant another weekend without birding too, but it takes no time to run a moth trap (albeit a bit to go through it in the morning). Best moth was a Pinon-streaked Snout, my first in Norfolk having only seen one in Scilly before. Cyclamen Tortrix Clepsis spectrana was another that never made it on to my Bawdeswell house list. Other insects that I never noted at Bawdeswell included a Birch Shieldbug and one of the distinctive Athripsodes caddisflies. Other moths included Gorse Crest Brachmia blandella, 2 Marbled Piercers Cydia splendana, Chinese Character, Maiden's Blush, Lime-speck Pug, Canary-shouldered Thorn, Poplar Hawkmoth, Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing, Square-spotted Clay and Straw Underwing.

click for larger image click for larger image

Cyclamen Tortrix Clepsis spectrana (left) and Pinion-streaked Snout (right), North Elmham, 16th August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Maiden's Blush (left) and Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing (right), North Elmham, 16th August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Marbled Piercers Cydia splendana, North Elmham, 16th August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Lime-speck Pug (left) and Birch Shieldbug (right), North Elmham, 16th August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Anthripsodes sp. (left) and probable Pond Olive Cloeon dipterum (right), North Elmham, 16th August - the Mayfly was very different from yesterday's but it seems that they're quite sexually dimorphic

 

Friday 15th August

The garden was lively with birds when I was sorting out last night's moth trap, though nothing more exciting than Chiffchaff, 2 Blackcaps and a very large mixed flock of tits. Tonight's moths included a Purple Bar - a moth I occasionally saw during the day before I was seriously interested in moths but which I'd not seen in the last 10 years. Other moths tonight included House Groundling Bryotropha domestica, Marbled Piercer Cydia splendana, Flame Carpet, Tawny Speckled Pug, Dusky Thorn, Coxcomb Prominent, 2 Square-spotted Clays, Six-striped Rustic and Angle Shades.

click for larger image click for larger image

Purple Bar (left) and Flame Carpet (right), North Elmham, 15th August

 

click for larger image  

Pond Olive Cloeon dipterum, North Elmham, 15th August - at least I think that's what this Mayfly is

 

Thursday 14th August

Fairly good numbers of moths tonight, though 50 Common Grass-veneers Agriphila tristella made up a good proportion of them. Best moth was a Knot Grass - apparently not uncommon by any means but nevertheless a new species for me! Another that I've seen a few times but never recorded in 8 years at my old house was Lesser Swallow Prominent. Square-spot Rustic and Rosy Rustic were both new for the year and other moths in the trap included Cinereous Groundling Bryotropha terrella, Chequered Fruit-tree Tortrix Pandemis corylana, 3 Elbow-stripe Grass-veneers Agriphila geniculea, Coxcomb Prominent, Turnip Moth, Square-spotted Clay, Six-striped Rustic, Lychnis and Copper Underwing.

click for larger image click for larger image

Lesser Swallow Prominent (left) and Knot Grass (right), North Elmham, 14th August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Rosy Rustic (left) and Turnip Moth (right), North Elmham, 14th August

 

click for larger image  

Coxcomb Prominent, North Elmham, 14th August

 

Wednesday 13th August

Elbow-stripe Grass-veneer Agriphila geniculea was new for the year. Other moths tonight included Common Marbled Carpet (my first of this generation), 2 Common Waves, Iron Prominent, Lychnis and 2 White-points.

click for larger image  

Hay bales, Wolferton, 13th August - taken with the iPhone in my lunch break - think I should have used a proper camera

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Elbow-stripe Grass-veneer Agriphila geniculea (left) and Dark-triangle Button Acleris laterana (or perhaps Strawberry Tortrix Acleris comariana; right), North Elmham, 13th August

 

Tuesday 12th August

My second ever Honeysuckle Moth Ypsolopha dentella appeared in the trap tonight. My house at Bawdeswell has a garden full of rampant Honeysuckle so it's surprising that I never recorded one there. In contrast this house doesn't appear to have any Honeysuckle. Another of tonight's moths was even better, being one I'd never recorded anywhere before: Maple Slender Caloptilia semifascia. Others included what I think was the dark form of Golden Argent Argyresthia goedartella, Wainscot Smudge Ypsolopha scabrella, Chequered Fruit-tree Tortrix Pandemis corylana, Small Birch Bell Epinotia ramella, Marbled Piercer Cydia splendana, Lime-speck Pug, Canary-shouldered Thorn, Turnip Moth, 4 Small Square-spots, Six-striped Rustic, Rustic and Vine's Rustic.

click for larger image click for larger image

Maple Slender Caloptilia semifascia (left) and Honeysuckle Moth Ypsolopha dentella (right), North Elmham, 12th August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Marbled Piercer Cydia splendana (left) and Small Birch Bell Epinotia ramella (right), North Elmham, 12th August

 

click for larger image  

presumed Golden Argent Argyresthia goedartella, North Elmham, 12th August

 

Monday 11th August

Another moth tonight that I never recorded at Bawdeswell - Birch Marble Apotomis betuletana - I find them to be common elsewhere so perhaps surprising I never got one before at Bawdeswell. Otherwise Treble-bar, Canary-shouldered Thorn (both species I rarely saw at Bawdeswell) and two more Straw Underwings were the highlights tonight.

click for larger image click for larger image

Birch Marble Apotomis betuletana (left) and White-point (right), North Elmham, 11th August

 

Sunday 10th August

A Greenshank flew over the house this morning as I was going through the moth trap - a species I never recorded in Bawdeswell. Poor mothing weather meant for a trap that wasn't exactly heaving tonight. Perhaps the most interesting moth was another confusing Argyresthia. Like last night, I thought at first it was going to be goedartella but on closer inspection it doesn't appear right for that species - but not like last night's either. Again, please let me know if you can identifiy it!

click for larger image click for larger image

Argyresthia sp., North Elmham, 10th August - another biggish species with a wingspan of about 12 mm

 

click for larger image  

Orange Swift, North Elmham, 10th August

 

Saturday 9th August

Moved house today. We're now in North Elmham. What with the move and a stag do in the evening I was pretty cream-crackered by the end of the day but I've acquired a new moth trap to go with the new house so I no longer have to stay up to process the moths before I go to bed. The Robinson trap did its stuff while I was snoozing and there were plenty of moths to go through in the morning.

I expected a different range of species to appear in this house compared to the last house - the surrounding habitat is quite different. That proved true even on the first night - two species turned up that never appeared at Bawdeswell in the 8 years I was there: Tawny-barred Angle and Straw Underwing. In addition Magpie Moth was a nice surprise - the species is relatively scarce in Norfolk and I've seen a couple in the county before, once at Bawdeswell. Two Six-striped Rustics and a Flounced Rustic were new for the year and other moths of note were Bordered Carl Emmetia marginea, Birdís-nest Moth Tinea trinotella, 4 Long-horned Flat-bodies Carcina quercana, 3 Chequered Grass-veneers Catoptria falsella, Ringed China-mark Parapoynx stratiotata, Beautiful China-mark Nymphula stagnata, 2 Orange Swifts, Tawny Speckled Pug, Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing, 2 Small Square-spots, Angle Shades and Vine's Rustic.

Another micro was more confusing. I thought it was going to be Argyresthia brockeella or goedartella, but it wasn't like either species normally appear. The white along the costa should make it the much scarcer Argyresthia pygmaeella, but other features aren't right. As I type I'm not sure what it is - your views would be welcome! Another moth I wasn't sure about was one of the Dark-triangle Button Acleris laterana types - see photos below.

click for larger image click for larger image

Magpie Moth (left) and Straw Underwing (right), North Elmham, 9th August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Argyresthia sp., North Elmham, 9th August - can you identify this? It was a biggish species - about 12 mm wingspan I think

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Acleris laterana aggs., North Elmham, 9th August - the one on the left seems fairly typical but the one on the right is more unusual - it was quite a bit larger than the one on the left, though still within range for laterana... or is it something else?

 

click for larger image  

Flounced Rustic, North Elmham, 9th August

 

Friday 8th August

Spent today trying to get packed up ready for the house move tomorrow morning. Consequently I made no attempt to catch any moths, though with windows open and lights on a few came in anyway. No grand finale among them but White-shouldered Smudge Ypsolopha parenthesella was only my second at Bawdeswell and there was also a Brown China-mark Elophila nymphaeata.

 

Thursday 7th August

Had a stroll at Houghton in my lunch break today. The pig fields that often hold large gulls aren't easily viewed from the road this year but I could see them from the path. Didn't have my scope with me but saw at least 2 Yellow-legged Gulls among them.

Tonight's moths included 2 Square-spotted Clays - it's evidently a good year for these. A Small Square-spot was my first of this generation and other moths included Brindled Flat-body Agonopterix arenella, 2 Gold Triangles Hypsopygia costalis and White-point.

click for larger image click for larger image

Square-spotted Clay (left) and Gold Triangle Hypsopygia costalis (right), Bawdeswell, 7th August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Small Square-spot (left) and White-point (right), Bawdeswell, 7th August

 

Tuesday 5th August

Nothing better than a couple of Cabbage Moths among tonght's catch.

click for larger image click for larger image

Blackbird, Bawdeswell, 5th August

 

Monday 4th August

Stopped at Beacon Hill in my lunch break where I heard a Turtle Dove purring and saw a Latticed Heath. I did put the MV on for a bit tonight and got a Maple Button Acleris forsskaleana, only my second here and first this year. White-point was my first for a while and another Sycamore Piercer Pammene aurita was a surprise, hot on the heels of my first two ever on Friday. Others included 2 Cork Moths Nemapogon cloacella, Bird-cherry Ermine Yponomeuta evonymella, Little Ermel Swammerdamia pyrella, presumed Marbled Cosmet Mompha propinquella, probable Dark-triangle Button Acleris laterana, Chequered Grass-veneer Catoptria falsella and Gold Triangle Hypsopygia costalis.

The Gold Triangle was my 15th this year - remarkable for a moth I normally see once a year, twice in 2011 but never more than that before.

click for larger image click for larger image

Paloptera muliebris (left) and Robin (right), Bawdeswell, 4th August

 

click for larger image  

probable Dark-triangle Button Acleris laterana (or Strawberry Tortrix Acleris comariana), Bawdeswell, 4th August

 

Sunday 3rd August

No MV again tonight as we're busy getting ready for the move next weekend. A few moths always come in anyway and tonight's included a White-speckled Clothes Moth Nemapogon wolffiella - when I had one in 2011 it was second for Norfolk and with two more last year I'd notched up 75% of the county records. No more though - mine this year is the fifth to be recorded in 2014. Summer Rose Bell Notocelia roborana was only my third here and a Grey Poplar Bell Epinotia nisella was the same form as the one on Friday night - odd for such a variable species.

click for larger image click for larger image

Summer Rose Bell Notocelia roborana (left) and White-speckled Clothes Moth Nemapogon wolffiella (right), Bawdeswell, 3rd August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Mother of Pearl Pleuroptya ruralis (left) and Grey Poplar Bell Epinotia nisella (right), Bawdeswell, 3rd August

 

Saturday 2nd August

Didn't put the MV light on tonight so only a few moths - among them was my first Cabbage Moth of the year, a Tawny Speckled Pug of the form lacking an orange patch and a Chequered Straw Evergestis pallidata.

click for larger image  

Tawny Speckled Pug, Bawdeswell, 2nd August

 

Friday 1st August

The new month got off to a flying start with another first for Norfolk! An unfamiliar but distinctive moth was soon identified as Italian Tubic Metalampra italica, a species known only from Italy until 2003 when one was found in Devon. Since then it has been recorded in several southern counties and is assumed to be breeding both in southern Britain and also in Belgium. It's been recorded in Suffolk before but tonight's individual in my bedroom is the first for Norfolk.

update: oh no it isn't! It was a Metalampra italica (thanks to Jon for gen detting for confirmation) but I was pipped to the post for the first for Norfolk - one was trapped at Titchwell on Tuesday night! Mine was therefore the second record, but the first for the vice county VC27!

This wasn't my only new moth tonight - there were also 2 Sycamore Piercers Pammene aurita which were my first, and an Ash-bark Knot-horn Euzophera pinguis, my first record for the house. So with three additions to the house moth list tonight the list rises to 555. Will I get any more additions before I move out next Saturday? Other good moths included Square-spotted Clay which I've only seen here once before and Grey Poplar Bell Epinotia nisella which was new for the year and which isn't common here. As surprising were 3 Slender Pugs - I've only had singles before and not often. A better looking moth that I've only recorded here occasionally (though quite often elsewhere) was Black Arches. Among the rest were Carrion Moth Monopis weaverella, Daisy Bent-wing Bucculatrix nigricomella, 2 Wainscot Smudges Ypsolopha scabrella, 2 Small Dingy Tubics Borkhausenia fuscescens, 2 Bulrush Cosmets Limnaecia phragmitella, Chequered Fruit-tree Tortrix Pandemis corylana, Small Purple and Gold (Mint Moth) Pyrausta aurata, Gold Triangle Hypsopygia costalis, Double-striped Tabby Hypsopygia glaucinalis, Tawny Speckled Pug and Angle Shades.

click for larger image click for larger image

Italian Tubic Metalampra italica, Bawdeswell, 1st August - confirmed by gen det

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Sycamore Piercers Pammene aurita, Bawdeswell, 1st August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Daisy Bent-wing Bucculatrix nigricomella (left) and Grey Poplar Bell Epinotia nisella, Bawdeswell, 1st August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

presumed Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana (left) and Ash-bark Knot-horn Euzophera pinguis, Bawdeswell, 1st August - not seen a postvittana looking quite like this before but can't think what else it could be: am I right?

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Double-striped Tabby Hypsopygia glaucinalis (left) and Tawny Speckled Pug, Bawdeswell, 1st August

 

click for larger image click for larger image

Angle Shades (left) and Square-spotted Clay, Bawdeswell, 1st August

 

 

Last month: July 2014

Previous months:

2007: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul ; Aug ; Sep ; Oct ; Nov ; Dec ;

 

2008: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul ; Aug ; Sep ; Oct ; Nov ; Dec ;

 

2009: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul ; Aug ; Sep ; Oct ; Nov ; Dec ;

 

2010: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul ; Aug ; Sep ; Oct ; Nov ; Dec ;

 

2011: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul ; Aug ; Sep ; Oct ; Nov ; Dec ;

 

2012: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul ; Aug ; Sep ; Oct ; Nov ; Dec ;

 

2013: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul ; Aug ; Sep ; Oct ; Nov ; Dec ;

 

2014: Jan ; Feb ; Mar ; Apr ; May ; Jun ; Jul